Astral Imaging at Dogwood Ridge Observatory

Latitude: 3748'51.0" N"
Longitude:7823'41.0"W
Scottsville, Virginia 24590

 

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vdB 1
Image Information

Quoted froms APOD:


Explanation: Every book has a first page and every catalog a first entry. And so this lovely blue cosmic cloud begins the van den Bergh Catalog (vdB) of stars surrounded by reflection nebulae. Interstellar dust clouds reflecting the light of the nearby stars, the nebulae usually appear blue because scattering by the dust grains is more effective at shorter (bluer) wavelengths. The same type of scattering gives planet Earth its blue daytime skies. Van den Bergh's 1966 list contains a total of 158 entries more easily visible from the northern hemisphere, including bright Pleiadescluster stars and other popular targets for astroimagers. Less than 5 light-years across, VdB1 lies about 1,600 light-years distant in the constellation Cassiopeia. Also on this scene, two intriguing nebulae at the right show loops and outflow features associated with the energetic process of star formation. Within are extremely young variable stars V633 Cas (top) and V376 Cas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This image is one of my longest yet. The luminance data is 83 - 15 minute frames (20-3/4 hours) and there are 68 RGB frames each 15 minutee each (17 hours) with 6 hours red, 6 hours green, and 5 hours blue. Image processed in Pix Insight. Data acquired using ACP Scheduler and MaxIm 5.24.

Equipment and Location Information

Date June 6- Nov 15, 2015
Location Dogwood Ridge Observatory
Optics Optical Guidance Systems 12.5" RC @f/9
Mount Astro Physics AP1200GTO
Camera SBIG STL-11002M/CW8
Filters Baader LRGB Ha 7nm,SII 8nm, OIII 8.5nm - 50.8mm Unmounted Filters
Conditions Temperature low to mid 50s - 60s with moderate to good  seeing. Transparency good.

   
    
  Last Modified :10/02/12 01:10 PM